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Ten fun facts about Millard Fillmore


1. 13th US President Born in Finger Lakes

Millard Fillmore, the 13th President of the United States, was born in the Finger Lakes region of New York State on January 7, 1800. He lived a long and eventful life, serving as President from 1850 to 1853, before passing away on March 8, 1874. During his time in office, Fillmore was known for his moderate stance on the slavery issue, and for his support of the Compromise of 1850. He was also the last President to be a member of the Whig Party.

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2. 13th President of the United States: Millard Fillmore was a Whig

Millard Fillmore was the 13th President of the United States, and the last to be a member of the Whig Party. He was elected in 1850 and served until 1853, when he was succeeded by Franklin Pierce. During his presidency, Fillmore was a strong advocate for the Compromise of 1850, which sought to resolve the issue of slavery in the United States. He also supported the Fugitive Slave Act, which allowed for the return of escaped slaves to their owners. Fillmore's presidency was marked by his commitment to the Whig Party, and he was the last president to be a member of the party before it dissolved in 1856.

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3. VP Fillmore Becomes President After Incumbent's Death

When Zachary Taylor died in 1850, Millard Fillmore, who had been serving as his Vice President, succeeded him as President of the United States. This was the first time in American history that a Vice President had assumed the office of President due to the death of the incumbent. Fillmore served as President until 1853, when he was succeeded by Franklin Pierce.

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4. 13th US Prez & Compromise of 1850

Millard Fillmore, the 13th President of the United States, was a strong supporter of the Compromise of 1850. During the Mexican–American War, Fillmore resisted the suggestion to keep slavery out of the newly acquired territories, as he believed it would help to conciliate with the South. This decision was highly controversial at the time, but Fillmore stood firm in his support of the Compromise of 1850.

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5. Fillmore's Foreign Policy: Promoting Trade and Opposing Interference

Millard Fillmore was a strong advocate of foreign trade, particularly with Japan. He was also a vocal opponent of Napoleon III's attempts to seize Hawaii, and of the French and British efforts to support Narciso López's attempt to occupy Cuba. Fillmore believed that increased trade with Japan would benefit the United States, and he was determined to protect American interests in the Caribbean. His efforts to promote trade and oppose foreign interference in the region were a cornerstone of his foreign policy.

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6. A Political Legacy in Conflict

After his presidency, Millard Fillmore became a prominent figure in the Know-Nothing movement, a political party that opposed immigration and the expansion of slavery. His views on these issues put him at odds with President Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War, but he later supported President Andrew Johnson's Reconstruction efforts. Fillmore's involvement in the Know-Nothing movement and his conflicting views on the Civil War and Reconstruction demonstrate his complex political legacy.

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7. Bottom 10 US President?

Millard Fillmore, the 13th President of the United States, is often ranked among the bottom 10 of all presidents in terms of historical significance. His presidency, which lasted from 1850 to 1853, is largely remembered for his signing of the Compromise of 1850, which attempted to resolve the issue of slavery in the United States. Despite his efforts to maintain the Union, Fillmore's presidency is often seen as a failure, and he is consistently ranked among the least successful presidents in American history.

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8. Lasting Legacy in Buffalo

Millard Fillmore was a man of many accomplishments. Not only did he serve as the 13th President of the United States, but he also co-founded the University at Buffalo, helped to create the Buffalo Historical Society, and was instrumental in the establishment of the Buffalo General Hospital. His legacy in the Buffalo area is still felt today, and his contributions to the city are remembered and celebrated.

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9. 13th US President & Mexican-American War Vet

Millard Fillmore, the 13th President of the United States, served in the New York military during the Mexican–American War. He was a member of the New York State Militia, where he was promoted to the rank of Major and served as a brigade judge advocate. During his time in the military, Fillmore was responsible for organizing and training the militia, as well as providing legal advice to the brigade. He was also involved in the Battle of Monterey, where he was praised for his bravery and leadership.

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10. Honor Parks, Schools, and Counties

Millard Fillmore, the 13th President of the United States, has been honored with numerous parks, schools, and counties named after him. These include the Fillmore Glen State Park in New York, Millard Fillmore Elementary School in California, Fillmore County in Minnesota, and Fillmore County in Nebraska. These memorials serve as a reminder of his legacy and his impact on the nation.

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Short about Millard Fillmore
Was the 13th President of the United States (1850–1853).

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